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Systematic Reviews: Scoping Review

A Synthesis and Evaluation of existing evidence

Scoping Review

Scoping Reviews: Scoping reviews aim to map the existing literature on a broad topic, identify key concepts, definitions, and evidence gaps, and clarify the scope of further research. Unlike systematic reviews, scoping reviews typically do not assess the quality of included studies or synthesize findings quantitatively. Instead, they provide a descriptive overview of the literature and may involve thematic analysis or qualitative synthesis.

  • Methodology: Scoping reviews aim to map the existing literature on a broad topic, identify key concepts, definitions, and evidence gaps, and clarify the scope of further research. They typically involve a systematic search of multiple databases, screening of search results based on broad inclusion/exclusion criteria, data charting to summarize key findings, and thematic analysis to identify patterns or themes.
  • Objectives: The primary objective of scoping reviews is to provide a descriptive overview of the existing literature on a topic, rather than synthesizing evidence to answer a specific research question. They aim to identify the breadth and depth of literature, map key concepts and evidence sources, and inform future research directions.
  • Applications: Scoping reviews are useful for exploring emerging topics, mapping the landscape of existing research, identifying research gaps or priorities, and informing the development of systematic reviews or other research projects. They are commonly used in fields such as public health, social sciences, and environmental sciences to address complex and multifaceted research questions.