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CEMS Harvard Referencing Style: Journal Articles

Referencing Journal Articles

IN-TEXT CITATION

Terrill (1992) ...

.... (Terrill, 1992)

"....." (Terrill, 1992:25)


FORMAT OF A REFERENCE TO A JOURNAL ARTICLE

Author’s Surname, Initials. Date of publication. Title of article, Journal name (in italics) followed by a comma, volume number (part no): page numbers.

Note that the title of the article is in quotation marks.


EXAMPLE OF A REFERENCE TO A PRINTED JOURNAL ARTICLE

Terrill, C.A. 1992. The ten commandments of new service development, Management Review, 81(2): 24-27.


FORMAT OF A REFERENCE TO AN ELECTRONIC JOURNAL ARTICLE

Note:   Use these guidelines when the pagination of journals on electronic full-text databases differs from their print equivalent, or is not supplied at all, or is only in HTML format. It is important to indicate to your reader which format of the journal you are using. 

Author’s Surname, Initials. Year. Title of article, Journal title, (in italics) [type of medium], volume (issue number): pagination if given or any other indicator of length. Available at: Supplier/Database Name and Number/Identifier Number, Item or Accession Number [Date accessed]


EXAMPLE OF A REFERENCE TO AN ELECTRONIC JOURNAL ARTICLE FROM A DATABASE

Husted, B.W. and Allen, D. B. 2000. Is it ethical to use ethics as strategy?, ​Journal of Business Ethics, 27(1-2): 17-18. Available at: <https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1006422704548>. [ Accessed on:13 October 2015].

Husted, B.W. and Allen, D. B. 2000. Is it ethical to use ethics as strategy?, ​Journal of Business Ethics, 27(1-2): 17-18. doi:10.1023/A:1006422704548. [ Accessed on:13 October 2015].

A DOI is a unique ID number that publishers use  to identify electronic articles. If there is a DOI, the URL is not needed. If there is no DOI, then you need to add the URL


EXAMPLE OF A REFERENCE TO AN ELECTRONIC JOURNAL ARTICLE FROM AN ONLINE ONLY JOURNAL

Nicolaides, A. 2018, Ethical Hospitality Marketing, Brand-Boosting and Business Sustainability, African Journal of Hospitatlity, Tourism and Leisure, 7(1). Available at :<https://www.ajhtl.com/uploads/7/1/6/3/7163688/article_7_vol_7__1__2018.pdf> [Accessed on: 29 March 2018].


Note: the same principles of 'and' versus '&', and the principles regarding the number of authors, are applicable to citing and referencing journal articles 

This section deals with journal articles which have been submitted for publication, but have not been published yet.


IN-TEXT CITATION

Murray (2001) ...

.... (Murray, 2001)

"....." (Murray, 2001 : article submitted for publication).

In this case, refer to it as (Murray, 2001).  When quoting directly, indicate that it has not yet been published, as follows:  “... e-commerce promises quick profits, but suppliers must be cautious...” (Murray, 2001: article submitted for publication).


FORMAT OF A REFERENCE TO A JOURNAL ARTICLE SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION

Author’s Surname, Initials. Year of submission. 'Title of article', Journal name (in italics)Manuscript submitted for publication.


ARTICLES SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION

Murray, J. 2001. 'E-commerce, is it that promising?' PC Week. Manuscript submitted for publication.


EXAMPLE OF A REFERENCE TO A JOURNAL ARTICLE SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION

Murray, J. 2001. ‘E-commerce, is it that promising?’ PC Week. Manuscript submitted for publication.


 

Omah (2001) ...

.... Omah, 2001)

"....." (Omah, 2001 : in press).


FORMAT OF A REFERENCE TO A JOURNAL ARTICLE THAT IS IN PRESS

Author’s Surname, Initials. Year of printing. ‘Title of article’, Journal name (in italics). Manuscript in press.


EXAMPLE OF A REFERENCE TO A JOURNAL ARTICLE THAT IS IN PRESS

Omah, A. 2001. ‘Service excellence in local business’, People Dynamics. Manuscript in press.


 

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